Category: in the news

Paul Macklin featured in Biotechniques article

Paul Macklin’s work on mathematical modeling of breast cancer and BioFVM was recently featured in Kelly Rae Chi’s article in Biotechniques on virtual cell cultures. It also included great work by James Glazier (CompuCell3D) and Kristin Swanson (glioblastoma modeling).

Read the article: http://www.biotechniques.com/news/Mighty-Modelers-The-Art-of-Virtual-Cell-Culture/biotechniques-364893.html (July 20, 2016)


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Paul Macklin profiled in New Scientist article

Paul Macklin was recently featured in a New Scientist article on multidisciplinary jobs in cancer.  It profiled the non-linear path he and others took to reach a multi-disciplinary career blending biology, mathematics, and computing.

Read the article: http://jobs.newscientist.com/article/knocking-cancer-out/ (Apr. 16, 2015)

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Paul Macklin calls for common standards in cancer modeling

At a recent NCI-organized mini-symposium on big data in cancer, Paul Macklin called for new data standards in Multicellular data in simulations, experiments, and clinical science. USC featured the talk (abstract here) and the work at news.usc.edu.

Read the article: http://news.usc.edu/59091/usc-researcher-calls-for-common-standards-in-cancer-modeling/ (Feb. 21, 2014)

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Paul Macklin interviewed at 2013 PSOC Annual Meeting

Paul Macklin gave a plenary talk at the 2013 NIH Physical Sciences in Oncology Annual Meeting. After the talk, he gave an interview to the Pauline Davies at the NIH on the need for data standards and model compatibility in computational and mathematical modeling of cancer. Of particular interest:

Pauline Davies: How would you ever get this standardization? Who would be responsible for saying we want it all reported in this particular way?

Paul Macklin: That’s a good question. It’s a bit of the chicken and the egg problem. Who’s going to come and give you data in your standard if you don’t have a standard? How do you plan a standard without any data? And so it’s a bit interesting. I just think someone needs to step forward and show leadership and try to get a small working group together, and at the end of the day, perfect is the enemy of the good. I think you start small and give it a go, and you add more to your standard as you need it. So maybe version one is, let’s say, how quickly the cells divide, how often they do it, how quickly they die, and what their oxygen level is, and maybe their positions. And that can be version one of this standard and a few of us try it out and see what we can do. I think it really comes down to a starting group of people and a simple starting point, and you grow it as you need it.

Shortly after, the MultiCellDS project was born (using just this strategy above!), with the generous assistance of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Read / Listen to the interview: http://physics.cancer.gov/report/2013report/PaulMacklin.aspx (2013)

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Macklin Lab featured on March 2013 cover of Notices of the American Mathematical Society

I’m very excited to be featured on this month’s cover of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society. The cover shows a series of images from a multiscale simulation of a tumor growing in the brain, made with John Lowengrub while I was a Ph.D. student at UC Irvine. (See Frieboes et al. 2007, Macklin et al. 2009, and Macklin and Lowengrub 2008.) The “about the cover” write-up (Page 325) gives more detail.

The inside has a short interview on our more current work, particularly 3-D agent-based modeling. You should also read Rick Durrett‘s perspective piece on cancer modeling (Page 304)—it’s a great read! (And yup, Figure 3 is from our patient-calibrated breast cancer modeling in Macklin et al. 2012. 😉 )

The entire March 2013 issue can be accessed for free at the AMS Notices website:

http://www.ams.org/notices/201303/

I want to thank Bill Casselman and Rick Durrett for making this possible. I had a lot of fun in the process, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to trade ideas!


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